Britney Spearss lawyer resigns, will leave once Britney has another lawyer


In her testimony in her conservatorship case, Britney Spears mentioned that she wasn’t even aware that she could petition to have the conservatorship removed. Britney said that her court-appointed lawyer, Sam Ingham, hadn’t informed her that she could do that and told her “I can’t let the public know anything they did to me. He told me I should keep it to myself.” Ingham has not filed to have Britney’s conservatorship terminated and legal experts have said that if he did not inform his client of her right to terminate that it was negligent. Ingham has now resigned Britney’s lawyer. While some may consider this a positive development for Britney, it may delay her case as I’ll get to in a moment. Here’s more, from US Weekly. Britney’s longterm manager, Larry Rudolph, has also resigned. The co-conservator of her estate, Bessemer Trust, is leaving as well while the conservator of her person, Jodi Montgomery, plans to stay on.

Britney Spears‘ court-appointed attorney, Samuel Ingham III, is stepping down less than one month after the 39-year-old pop star’s emotional conservatorship hearing, Us Weekly can confirm.

The California-based attorney filed a resignation request with the court on Tuesday, July 6, according to documents obtained by Us. The filing states that Ingham will step back from his role once the judge finds Spears a new court-appointed counsel.

Loeb & Loeb LLP, which is a secondary firm that was brought in to work with Ingham in October 2020, is also resigning. The private firm’s decision to resign from the conservatorship also will take effect once new counsel is approved by the judge.

Loeb & Loeb LLP, which is a secondary firm that was brought in to work with Ingham in October 2020, is also resigning. The private firm’s decision to resign from the conservatorship also will take effect once new counsel is approved by the judge.

[From US Magazine]

US Magazine quotes an expert who says that it’s possible there could be a hearing to determine whether Britney is competent enough to hire her own counsel. I really hope that happens for her and that she gets the right to hire someone representing her interests. This comes right after The New Yorker published Ronan Farrow’s explosive report on Britney’s conservatorship. That piece details how quickly the conservatorship was established when Britney was going through a crisis as she was losing custody of her children. Britney was being controlled by other men in her orbit, and then her father, Jamie, took over legally. The way Farrow explains it, Jamie emotionally abused Britney while controlling her finances and access to her children. Britney went to great lengths to try to get a cell phone, to attempt to get her own lawyer, and to try to get the word out about what was happening to her. Everyone she befriended and asked for help, including a housekeeper and a photographer, were found out and fired by the team of people controlling her.

I asked my friend Lisa for a quote about this. She’s a cohost of the Eat, Pray, Britney podcast and I spoke to her on episode #82 of our podcast. Lisa thinks that Ingham’s resignation may delay Britney’s case. She said “The scary thing is, Britney has no legal right to pick her own attorney and it’s unclear how she would get ahold of a new lawyer even if she could pick because they are restricting her interactions with people and her phone and internet use.

One thing Farrow covered that struck me is the issue of conservatorships becoming a self-fulfilling loop that’s impossible to escape. Everything Britney does is seen under that lens. Farrow quotes a disability rights advocate, Jonathan Martinis, who says that people are screwed under conservatorships, basically, and that the burden of proof is incredibly high. Martinis detailed something that sounds quite similar to a study I learned about in psychology class, the Rosenhan experiment. He said “If a conservatee functions well under conservatorship, it can be framed as proof of the arrangement’s necessity; if a conservatee struggles under conservatorship, the same conclusion can be drawn. And if a conservatee gets out, and stumbles into crisis or manipulation—a likelihood increased by time spent formally disempowered—this, too, might reinforce the argument for their prior legal restraints.” Britney had a residency in Vegas for four years. What more can she do to earn her freedom, when she hasn’t been able to go public with her story for 13 years?

photos via Instagram

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