Ice-cool! Team GB's VERY hunky Olympic athletes competing

Is this Team GB’s hunkiest squad EVER? Athletes set for the Beijing Winter Olympics include a skier who’s a gay icon and the heartthrob bobsleigh team (and they’re rather fond of a NAKED Instagram snap!)

  • The 2022 Winter Olympics officially kick off with Friday’s opening ceremony
  • It is Team GB’s smallest squad for a Winter Games since 2010 in Vancouver
  • Colorado-raised gay icon Gus Kenworthy will be competing for GB for first time
  • Meanwhile aerial skier Lloyd Wallace, 26, is just the latest Olympian in his family

Team GB will be hoping to hot up the slopes as the Winter Olympics kicks off on Friday night in Beijing.

And this year’s squad of ultra-handsome athletes might be the hunkiest team the competition has ever seen – from an uber-attractive bobsleigh crew to the adorable aerial skiier Lloyd Wallace.

While it may be Team GB’s smallest squad for a Winter Games since 2010 in Vancouver, that won’t stop the men leaving many fans hot under the collar. 

Among those representing Great Britain in China is freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy, one of the world’s best known winter sports athletes who has previously competed for Team USA. 

Meanwhile bobsledders Taylor Lawrence and Brad Hall might be pros on the ice, but they’re also well practiced in stripping off to show off their toned physiques to their thousands of Instagram followers.  

Here FEMAIL reveals the handsome hunks you won’t want to miss during this year’s games…   

Team GB will be hotting up the slopes as the Winter Olympics kicks off on Friday night in Beijing – thanks, in part to their most handsome squad EVER (pictured, Gus Kenworthy in French Polynesia) 


This year’s squad of ultra-handsome athletes might be the hunkiest team the competition has ever seen – from an uber-attractive bobsleigh crew (pictured left, Taylor Lawrence in Devon, and right, Brad Hall)

Meanwhile the handsome aerial skier Lloyd Wallace is also unafraid to show off his toned body online (pictured while holidaying in Valencia) 

FREESTYLE SKIING

Gus Kenworthy 

Gus is a big name across the Atlantic and regularly transcends winter sports. 

He boasts an Instagram following of 1.9 million people and is a huge presence in the LGBT community. He has also appeared in the ninth season of the popular TV series American Horror Story. 

Gus previously represented the United States of America at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

Last month, Kenworthy also appeared in his pal Colton Underwood’s controversial six-episode docuseries Coming Out Colton, which premiered December 3 on Netflix. 

With an Instagram following of 1.9 million, Gus is a big name across the Atlantic and regularly transcends winter sports (pictured, in Texas)  


The 5ft10in athlete regularly shares hunky snaps on Instagram with his fans, posing topless as he holidays in exotic locations (pictured left, in French Polynesia and right, in Greece) 

Gus (pictured) competing during the Freestyle Skiing Men’s Ski Slopestyle qualification on day nine of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games

British-born, Colorado-raised Kenworthy is due to compete for Great Britain in the XXIV Olympic Winter Games.

‘I am also doing this for my mother who was born and lived in the UK for much of her life,’ the AHS: 1984 actor explained in a 2019 statement.

‘She has always been my greatest supporter throughout my career. She taught me to ski when I was three years old and is the reason I compete today. It’s great to now be representing GB – a country which means so much to me and my family.’

Switching allegiance to Britain will also allow him to try and compete in all three freestyle skiing disciplines (slopestyle, halfpipe, and big air, which has just been added to the Olympic programme), something that US Ski Team rules don’t allow.

The 30-year-old freestyle skier – who came out as gay in a 2015 ESPN interview – has been dating CAA Foundation executive Adam Umhoefer for two years.  

The 5ft10in athlete regularly shares hunky snaps on Instagram with his fans, posing topless as he holidays in exotic locations. 

AERIAL SKIIER 

Lloyd Wallace 

Growing up a gymnast, Lloyd switched to aerial skiing at the age of 14 after a family holiday to France (pictured, in Quebec)


The University of Bath graduate is returning to the sport having taken two years away from aerial skiing (pictured left, in the US, and right, in Rome, relaxing during his time off) 

Lloyd takes a qualifying run for the Men’s Aerials during the Intermountain Healthcare Freestyle International Ski World Cup at Deer Valley Resort on January 12, 2022

While some might be proud to have one Olympian in their family, Lloyd comes from a long-line of athletes who have competed in the Games.

His grandfather, Peter Curry, competed in the 1938 Summer Olympics in the 3,000 metres steeplechase.

Meanwhile his mother Jilly Curry competed at the 1992 and 1994 Winter Olympics, and won 29 FIS World Cup medals, which at the time was more than any other British skier or snowboarder. 

His father Robin has also represented Great Britain at the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, Canada.

And that’s not all – his uncle Shaun Wallace has also competed in track cycling at the 1984 and 1996 Summer Olympics. 

Growing up a gymnast, Lloyd switched to aerial skiing at the age of 14 after a family holiday to France.

He won his first medal, a bronze, at the  2015 FIS Junior freestyle skiing championships.

He went on to become  the first British skier to win a Europa Cup in men’s aerial skiing at Airolo, Switzerland in March 2015.

In August 2017 whilst Lloyd was training in Mettmenstetten, Switzerland, he had an accident which left him unconscious. He was then put in an induced coma. 

He later said that the accident was caused by hitting the edge of a ramp.

He returned to training eight weeks later, and competing in the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea two months later, becoming the first British aerial skier to compete in the Games since 1998.

The University of Bath graduate finished 20th. 

After the Games, he took a break from the sport and only returned in October 2020.

BOBSLEIGH 

Brad Hall  


Brad Hall, 32, from Crawley, is set to pilot both the two-man and four-man bobsleigh teams in Beijing (pictured left, enjoying some down time in the UK and right in Germany) 

The chiseled bobsledder often leads his team in sharing snaps on Instagram as he poses in next to nothing (pictured Brad, far left, in Austria) 

Britain’s Brad leads his co-pilot Nick Gleeson in action during the Men’s Two-Man Bobsleigh in Switzerland last month (pictured) 

Brad Hall, 32, from Crawley, is set to pilot both the two-man and four-man bobsleigh teams in Beijing.

Hall, who competed in the two-man and four-man events in Pyeongchang, has been on incredible form with his team.

He and two-man team-mate Nick Gleeson finished their final World Cup race in sixth place. They are now ranked in fifth place going into the Olympic Games. 

Hall, who claims that his fun fact about himself is being able to complete a Rubick’s cube in just 40 seconds, has also been climbing up the rankings with his four-man team. 

At the penultimate four-man race of the World Cup campaign in Winterberg, Germany, Hall piloted the sled to another stunning silver.

Hall, Taylor Lawrence, Nick Gleeson and Greg Cackett climbed up from fourth at the halfway stage to take second spot overall, meaning the University of Bath-based crew have now finished second, 11th, ninth, fifth, second, seventh, second and eighth in their four-man World Cup races this season.

After their final World Cup in St Moritz, the four-man team have moved up to fourth in the world rankings ahead of the games in Beijing.

Speaking to Olympics.com, Brad said he felt confident in the abilities of his team, saying: ‘Everyone knows that this year we are the ones to watch, and a lot of the nations are scared of what we can achieve because we’re another high performing team.  

‘We should be up there fighting for the podium positions once we have a clean stretch, and we’re looking really good going into the new season. 

‘The rest of my team are incredibly strong.’

Taylor Lawrence 

A serving Royal Marine Commando since September 2016, Taylor, 25, from Kent, only joined the GB Bobsleigh set up at the very end of 2019 (pictured while training in Germany) 


According to the BBSA website, the athlete, who is dating fellow athlete Emily Barrett describes himself as ‘big and competitive’ (left and right, in Devon) 

 Taylor (pictured) with his teammates Brad, Sam Blanchet, Greg Cackett  competing during the first run of the 4-man bobsleigh competition of the IBSF Bob and Skeleton World Cup

A serving Royal Marine Commando since September 2016, Taylor, 25, from  Kent, played Academy level football and rugby union before joining the Armed Forces at the age of 20.

He continued to play rugby and then rugby sevens and also won the Navy Cup with their football team. 

It was during a rugby game he was spotted by Adam Baird, a Sergeant who was also involved with the bobsleigh team.

The 6ft 4in only joined the GB Bobsleigh set up at the very end of 2019, calling it a baptism of fire, and went on to  make his international debut on the sport’s top circuit, the World Cup, less than a fortnight later.

According to  the BBSA website, he describes himself as ‘big and competitive’.

Speaking to the Sportsmen, Taylor explained: ‘The things that help you be a good soldier, organisational skills, the way you carry yourself, the way you interact with people, all those things, it definitely helps in the bobsleigh world and in the wider sporting world.

‘I wouldn’t say it is easy, but definitely the Marines I’d have to say was more difficult. 

‘But bobsleigh has its own challenges and its own things you have to overcome but I’ve taken all of it in my stride and I find myself here now.’ 

Meanwhile he is also dating fellow skeleton athlete Emily Barrett, with the pair often sharing loved-up snaps on their Instagram pages.   

ALPINE SKIING 

Billy Major  

Billy, 26, launched a JustGiving fundraising page in 2017 when he was struggling to pay his way on to the British team (pictured, visiting the Arctic Circle) 

He previously revealed his excitement at going to the Olympics, sharing an Instagram post as he took to the slopes as a toddler alongside his father 

Billy reacts in the finish during the second run of the men’s Slalom race of the FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup event in Schladming last month 

Billy, 26, has always loved any form of sport and notably skiing, when he started at a young age in France during the winters.

The skier, who won a Europa Cup in January and competed at last month’s Alpine Ski World Championships, launched a JustGiving fundraising page in 2017 when he was struggling to pay his way on to the British team. 

He previously revealed his excitement at going to the Olympics, sharing an Instagram post as he took to the slopes as a toddler alongside his father.

He wrote: ‘I am going to the Winter Olympics to represent Team GB.

‘I am beyond excited and very proud to get this opportunity! It’s been a serious journey since holding on to this pole. It hasn’t come easy and there have been lots of ups and downs to overcome. 

‘But I have worked hard and been lucky to have such amazing support of close family and friends throughout. 

‘So this is for all of you that have helped in any shape or form and supported me to get here. I will be the one in the start gate, but you will be part of it. Mum and Dad, thank you.’

CROSS COUNTRY SKIING

James Clugnet   

James, 26, was born and raised in the mountains around Grenoble, by a French ski lover and an English mother (pictured, holidaying in Norway) 

The handsome cross-country skier often shares snaps of his outdoorsy life on his Instagram page with his thousands of followers (pictured in  Norway) 

James began the sport as soon as he was old enough to put on skis, and quickly started Cross Country skiing

Cross-Country Skiing, undoubtedly the endurance sport of the Winter Olympic Games, will once again be in the spotlight in Beijing.

The sporting discipline was present when the first Winter Games was introduced in 1924, albeit then with just the men’s 50km and 18km competitions. However, cross-country skiing has been used as a mode of transport in Scandinavian areas for much longer, dating back over 6000 years.

In a quite remarkable sport, the cross-country skiers require immense strength to propel themselves along uphill, flat and downhill distances.

There will be three Team GB representatives in the Cross-country Skiing format this year, including James Clugnet, who recorded Britain’s best ever Cross-Country Ski team sprint result in December at the FIS Cross-Country Skiing Team Sprint Finals in Dresden.

James, 26, was born and raised in the mountains around Grenoble, by a French ski lover and an English mother. 

He began the sport as soon as he was old enough to put on skis, and quickly started Cross Country skiing.

 By the age of 9, he was already doing his first races. 

He made his World Cup debut at Ruka in November 2017. Following a steady improvement, in 2020 he qualified twice for World Championship sprint semi-finals achieving his first top 10 in Åre. 

LUGE 

Rupert Staudinger 

Team GB, who have never won a Luge medal, will have only Rupert Staudinger competing in Beijing (pictured) 

Rupert competes in men’s single race during the FIL Luge World Cup at the end of last year (pictured) 

Luge and Skeleton make up two of the three sliding events at this year’s Winter Olympics in Beijing, with the third being Bobsleigh. 

The Luge has been part of the Games since 1964.

It requires immaculate precision, as the race of speed and concentration pushes competitors to every 1,000th of a second in a bid to claim a medal.

Team GB, who have never won a Luge medal, will have only Rupert Staudinger competing in Beijing. 

Rupert, 24,was born in Berchtesgaden in Bavaria to a British mother and German father.

The 24-year-old is attending his second Games, having consistently improved over the last Olympic cycle.

He told TeamGb.com: ‘It feels unreal to be selected to represent Team GB at another Winter Olympics. But, if I’m honest, it still hasn’t really sunk in because of all these Covid restrictions.’

He added he felt ‘super happy’ to go to Beijing.   

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