Two children die in NHS hospital as GP warns patients are staying away

Two children die in NHS hospital as GP warns patients are staying away over fears they will contract coronavirus

  • Dr Manpinder Sahota, from Gravesend, Kent, says people are afraid of hospitals 
  • The children died at Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford at around three weeks ago
  • GP wants to reassure patients that hospitals are disinfected and safe to attend
  • Medics warn avoiding hospitals and GP surgeries is a ‘ticking time bomb’ 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Two children have died in hospital as a GP raised concerns patients are staying away over fears about catching coronavirus. 

GP Dr Manpinder Sahota, from Gravesend, Kent, said a paediatric consultant called him up and voiced their concerns to him after both children suffered non-Covid related deaths at Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford. 

Senior public health figures have repeatedly raised concerns about people not attending hospitals for non-coronavirus related conditions during the pandemic. 

It comes as NHS statistics revealed April was the quietest month ever for A&E departments across England with only 916,581 emergency department visits recorded.  

Priti Patel announced 351 more coronavirus deaths in Britain today, taking the official number of victims to 36,393. 

Dr Manpinder Sahota, a GP from Gravesend, Kent, said a paediatric consultant called him up to say they were worried two children had died in the Dartford hospital because of a reluctance to going to hospital

Although the A&E admission figures appear to now be returning to normal levels, NHS England national medical director Stephen Powis stated there were concerns peoples’ worries about the virus and not wanting to burden the NHS were forcing them to attempt to care for themselves instead of going to to hospital.   

Dr Sahota, who works at Pelham Medical Centre, said he wanted to get the message out to the public that people should go to hospital if necessary, especially children ‘because they are coming in very, very ill’.

Details regarding the two children’s ages and why they were admitted to hospital are yet to be disclosed. They died at the hospital around three weeks ago. 

The Mirror reported Dr Sahota said: ‘Parents were actually frightened to bring their kids in and some of them are either dying at home or it’s too late when they do get to hospital.

‘But hospitals have been cleaned and disinfected and all the Covid patients are separated – so the risk of catching it is not huge.

‘There’s a lot of people who will be dead or dying, or have a poor prognosis as a result because of these non-Covid late presentations.’

The GP said he believes the number of non-coronavirus deaths will increase dramatically in the next three to six months. 

He stated he estimates bookings to his surgery have dropped by two-thirds since the pandemic despite him trying to persuade patients to come in.   

His patients reported they were too scared to come in to the surgery also resulting in a decrease in referrals, including cancer referrals.      

During the crisis and subsequent lockdown, people have been avoiding hospitals out of fear of adding extra pressure to the NHS or catching the virus while they’re in the hospital, doctors say.

A&E departments saw fewer visitors than ever in April but NHS spokesman Stephen Powis said levels were beginning to return to normal

Medics warn the massive change in behaviour is a ‘ticking time bomb’ which may result in more people ending up seriously ill or dying in the near future because they avoided getting medical help when they needed it.

Dr Nick Scriven, of the Society for Acute Medicine, which represents hospital doctors, said the drop in A&E attendances in April was ‘a significant concern’ and people’s conditions may have worsened as a result.

‘This is a ticking timebomb in itself and it will be exacerbated by a myriad of other pressures in the coming weeks,’ he said.

‘There will be an ongoing need to keep people with coronavirus separate from others to prevent transmission, with segregated wards effectively reducing immediately available beds, so attempting to manage increased demand will be very challenging.’  

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Families devastated as 98 die in coronavirus outbreak at New York nursing home – The Sun

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A NEW York nursing home is under fire after nearly 100 residents have died from Covid-19.

One devastated relative says her family were not even informed of the outbreak at the Isabella Geriatric Center.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates


So many people died following the "horrifying" outbreak officials had to rent a refrigerated truck to store bodies in.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said of the outbreak: "It is absolutely horrifying. It's inestimable loss, and it's just impossible to imagine so many people lost in one place."

Xiomara Garcia-King, who lost her father, Toribio Antonio Garcia says her dad had been sent to the 705-bed Manhattan home to recuperate from a tracheotomy.

The 62-year-old, who is described as being an "avid runner," was sent away from hospital amid fears he would catch the virus.

But just a week into his stay at the Isabella Center he was dead.

Daughter of Adrienne Blackett, 68 – who also passed away at the centre – Melody Jenkins says her mother wasn't tested for coronavirus.

She claims staff told her Ms Blackett would make it, despite Ms Jenkins recalling her mother "sounded horrible" and could "barely talk without gasping for air".

However, the 68-year-old passed away from the virus after showing symptoms.

Her daughter said: "It's crazy how fast [her death] took place".

In a statement, the center said it didn't have access to coronavirus testing in order to "quickly diagnose" residents and staff.
However, a spokesperson said access to testing is now  available and insisted they have reported accurate data to the Department of Health since the beginning of the pandemic.

It comes after New York Rep. Adriano Espaillat wrote a damning letter accusing nursing homes of not accurately reporting Covid-19 deaths of residents in their care.

 

Initially, state officials recorded only 13 deaths at the center – but have since admitted up to 46 residents who tested positive for the virus had died, and an additional 52 people who were exhibiting symptoms.
Not all residents died at the home, but it's thought the majority contracted it while in residence.

It's reported 239 New York nursing homes have experienced outbreaks of the virus, with some 3,065 deaths according to figures compiled up to Thursday.

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Does Bobby die in EastEnders?

Bobby Beale’s (Clay Milner Russell) life is hanging in the balance tonight after he collapses in a club full of people in EastEnders.

The teen heads along to the club night in Walford East in an attempt to woo his crush, Dotty (Milly Zero), who he spots handing out leaflets for the night.

However, he doesn’t manage to score much success, and not only does Dotty refuse to sell him laughing gas, he’s then beaten by his brother Peter (Dayle Hudson to buying her a drink.

Upset, but undeterred, the teen ends up buying laughing gas elsewhere but takes a bad reaction and collapses on the ground

Will he be okay?

Does Bobby die in EastEnders?

It is unclear whether or not Bobby will pull through the incident, although neither the show-makers or actor Clay have given any indication he plans to leave the soap.

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Speaking about the laughing gas, Milly told Metro.co.uk: ‘Nothing ever things go right for Bobby – he is recovering from a brain injury and he has told her that the last time he took drugs he ended up on the railway tracks so she tells him he is too young.

‘When he collapses, she is shocked because she made a point of not selling it to him.

‘She does genuinely have feelings for Bobby as a friend and she feels terrible when he collapses. He makes her laugh and he is funny but if it did come down to it, she would choose to be with Peter, she doesn’t want to miss out on that!’

It’s not the teenager’s first brush with death after he was left to die following an Islamophobic attack in February.

Can he pull through again?

EastEnders continues tonight at 7:30pm on BBC One.

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Share your views in the comments below.

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While Covid-19 victims die alone, paramedic is helping terminally-ill

A dignified death: While thousands of Covid-19 victims are forced to die alone, one Dutch paramedic is granting the terminally-ill their dying wishes during the coronavirus era

  • Kees Veldboer, 60, has helped more than 14,000 terminally ill people see out their final wishes
  • He runs the Ambulance Wish Foundation and drives patients to places they would like to say goodbye to
  • Since a lockdown was imposed in the Netherlands in mid March, Mr Veldboer has helped hundreds of others
  • Lockdown measures less stringent than in other European countries and so Mr Velboer has continued work
  • He has taken patients to see fields of tulips, one man to say goodbye to his horse and another to see his boat 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

As the coronavirus crisis has spread across the world, thousands of people have been forced to die alone, forcibly separated from their heartbroken families.

But Dutch ambulance driver Kees Veldboer, 60, who has helped to fulfil the dying wishes of more than 14,000 terminally ill patients, has been able to continue his work despite his country imposing a lockdown.

The retired paramedic, has been able to take hundreds of dying people on one final journey since the Netherlands imposed less stringent coronavirus measures than other European countries in March.

Mr Veldboer, the founder of Stichting Ambulance Wens – the Ambulance Wish Foundation in English – drives patients to places they would like to say goodbye to.

Dutch ambulance driver Kees Veldboer, 60, who has helped to fulfil the dying wishes of more than 14,000 terminally ill patients, has been able to continue his work despite his country imposing a lockdown. Pictured: A dying woman smiles next to a field of tulips

The retired paramedic, has been able to take hundreds of dying people on one final journey since the Netherlands imposed less stringent coronavirus measures than other European countries in March. Pictured: Mr Veldboer recently took a dying man to say goodbye to his beloved horse

With the help of his 61-year-old wife Ineke, 61, Mr Veldboer has turned his good deeds into his full time job

Among those he has recently helped is one man who was able to say goodbye to his horse, another who saw his beloved boat one last time, and several patients he took to see fields of tulips in bloom.

The Dutch government, led by Prime Minister Mark Rutte, imposed what they called an ‘intelligent lockdown’. 

Only businesses which involve touching, such as hairdressers and beauticians, have been forced to stop trading in the country.

And while people have been advised to stay at home, going out is allowed as long as people stay at least 1.5metres from each other.   

It means Mr Veldboer can still take people to open spaces to fulfil their dying wishes. 

Mr Veldboer said: ‘We fulfil wishes even now with the Coronavirus. We are not in a complete lockdown so we are able to make those wishes come true.

‘We can go to open spaces, to flower gardens, to an empty zoo, a park, a lot of people want to see the sea, it’s not forbidden.

‘As long as we go to open places and there are not many people around, just one or two with the patient, we are fine.

Mr Veldboer added that later this week he is heading to the south of Spain to pick up a terminally ill Dutchman who was hospitalised in the country.

‘He wanted to come back home to Netherlands to his family but he is stuck in Spain and his family is worried he will die there alone so we are going to help,’ he said.

‘Coronavirus is not going to stop us, no one will.’

Former paramedic Mr Veldboer said, ‘Coronavirus is not going to stop us, no one will’. Pictured: A dying woman is able to see a field of tulips one final time with her young relative

Mr Veldboer, the founder of Stichting Ambulance Wens – the Ambulance Wish Foundation in English – drives patients to places they would like to say goodbye to. Pictured: Mr Veldboer also helped one man who wanted to see his boat

Mr Veldboer said: ‘We fulfil wishes even now with the Coronavirus. We are not in a complete lockdown so we are able to make those wishes come true. Pictured: Another terminally ill woman was surrounded by beautiful flowers and a tree full of blossom

The retired paramedic came up with the idea for his work when he was transferring a terminally ill patient to another hospital.

During a delay in the journey, he asked the patient where he would like to go and they replied they would like to see Rotterdam Harbour a final time.

Mr Veldboer was even able to arrange for the stretcher-bound man to go sailing.

The retired paramedic came up with the idea for his work when he was transferring a terminally ill patient to another hospital. Pictured: One man was kept warm with a thick duvet as he lay in his bed next to a field of flowers and took pictures

While people have been advised to stay at home, going out is allowed as long as people stay at least 1.5metres from each other. It means Mr Veldboer can still take people to open spaces to fulfil their dying wishes. Pictured: Another dying patient was lucky enough to go to an ice rink

A year later Mr Veldboer founded his foundation and has brought terminally ill people to weddings, museums, galleries, car shows, football matches and stables, among other places.

With the help of his 61-year-old wife Ineke, Mr Veldboer has turned it into his full time job.

The Netherlands has now seen 37,845 coronavirus cases, with 4,475 people confirmed to have died.  

Mr Veldboer used to work as a paramedic. Pictured: Mr Veldboer also took this family and their dying relative to the beautiful Dutch countryside for one final visit 

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