Two children die in NHS hospital as GP warns patients are staying away

Two children die in NHS hospital as GP warns patients are staying away over fears they will contract coronavirus

  • Dr Manpinder Sahota, from Gravesend, Kent, says people are afraid of hospitals 
  • The children died at Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford at around three weeks ago
  • GP wants to reassure patients that hospitals are disinfected and safe to attend
  • Medics warn avoiding hospitals and GP surgeries is a ‘ticking time bomb’ 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Two children have died in hospital as a GP raised concerns patients are staying away over fears about catching coronavirus. 

GP Dr Manpinder Sahota, from Gravesend, Kent, said a paediatric consultant called him up and voiced their concerns to him after both children suffered non-Covid related deaths at Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford. 

Senior public health figures have repeatedly raised concerns about people not attending hospitals for non-coronavirus related conditions during the pandemic. 

It comes as NHS statistics revealed April was the quietest month ever for A&E departments across England with only 916,581 emergency department visits recorded.  

Priti Patel announced 351 more coronavirus deaths in Britain today, taking the official number of victims to 36,393. 

Dr Manpinder Sahota, a GP from Gravesend, Kent, said a paediatric consultant called him up to say they were worried two children had died in the Dartford hospital because of a reluctance to going to hospital

Although the A&E admission figures appear to now be returning to normal levels, NHS England national medical director Stephen Powis stated there were concerns peoples’ worries about the virus and not wanting to burden the NHS were forcing them to attempt to care for themselves instead of going to to hospital.   

Dr Sahota, who works at Pelham Medical Centre, said he wanted to get the message out to the public that people should go to hospital if necessary, especially children ‘because they are coming in very, very ill’.

Details regarding the two children’s ages and why they were admitted to hospital are yet to be disclosed. They died at the hospital around three weeks ago. 

The Mirror reported Dr Sahota said: ‘Parents were actually frightened to bring their kids in and some of them are either dying at home or it’s too late when they do get to hospital.

‘But hospitals have been cleaned and disinfected and all the Covid patients are separated – so the risk of catching it is not huge.

‘There’s a lot of people who will be dead or dying, or have a poor prognosis as a result because of these non-Covid late presentations.’

The GP said he believes the number of non-coronavirus deaths will increase dramatically in the next three to six months. 

He stated he estimates bookings to his surgery have dropped by two-thirds since the pandemic despite him trying to persuade patients to come in.   

His patients reported they were too scared to come in to the surgery also resulting in a decrease in referrals, including cancer referrals.      

During the crisis and subsequent lockdown, people have been avoiding hospitals out of fear of adding extra pressure to the NHS or catching the virus while they’re in the hospital, doctors say.

A&E departments saw fewer visitors than ever in April but NHS spokesman Stephen Powis said levels were beginning to return to normal

Medics warn the massive change in behaviour is a ‘ticking time bomb’ which may result in more people ending up seriously ill or dying in the near future because they avoided getting medical help when they needed it.

Dr Nick Scriven, of the Society for Acute Medicine, which represents hospital doctors, said the drop in A&E attendances in April was ‘a significant concern’ and people’s conditions may have worsened as a result.

‘This is a ticking timebomb in itself and it will be exacerbated by a myriad of other pressures in the coming weeks,’ he said.

‘There will be an ongoing need to keep people with coronavirus separate from others to prevent transmission, with segregated wards effectively reducing immediately available beds, so attempting to manage increased demand will be very challenging.’  

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NHS could have ‘answers on best drugs treatments for Covid by JUNE’ – The Sun


THE NHS could have "answers on the best treatment for the coronavirus by June" as the first clinical results of therapeutic drugs become available.

More than 9,000 patients up and down the country have enrolled on the recovery trials in order to help find a suitable treatment for the virus that has so far killed 30,947 people in the UK.

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A letter sent to directors of public health, GP practices and independent providers claimed if the recruitment for the clinical trials remains high then it will "allow us to move successful drugs into routine care".

In the letter, obtained by the Health Service Journal, four chief medical officers and NHS England’s national medical director Stephen Powis, claim that answers on treatments could be available in five to seven weeks.

The letter reads: "As new admissions fall due to the success of social/physical distancing measures it will become even more important that a high proportion of patients with covid-19 are enrolled on trials if we are to improve future treatment.

"If we can keep recruitment for Recovery high, above 1,000 patients per week, we could have answers on some treatments in five to seven weeks. This will allow us to move successful drugs into routine care."

Enrolment to Recovery which tests several drugs in hospitalised pre critical patients is at 13 per cent at present.

The letter also stated that the NHS is aware of the "operational pressure from Covid-19", and said it understood that it "makes research hard".

"Local situations will lead to variability in ability to recruit, but increasing this proportion is important."

Health Secretary Matt Hancock had previously announced other clinical trials that would test therapeutics on 20 to 60 patients.

The letter added that recruitment for the early phases of the study would be focused on more specialised centres across the UK, that already have experience of such trials.

Mr Hancock said he is throwing everything the country has to offer to create a vaccine for the virus.

He has so far offered up £20 million for trials at Oxford and has also given a further £22.5 million for trials at Imperial College London.

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NHS worker, 24, stabbed to death in 'ferocious unprovoked attack' seconds from home days after dad died from coronavirus

AN NHS hero whose dad had just died from coronarvius has been stabbed to death in a “ferocious unprovoked attack”.

David Gomoh, 24, from Canning Town, East London, was due to attend his dad’s funeral tomorrow after he died from the killer bug.

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But he was stabbed to death just seconds after leaving his home at 10.25pm on Sunday.

David, like his mother who is a nurse, worked for the NHS and was helping to keep NHS staff supplied with essential equipment.

He was talking on the phone to a female friend when he was stabbed "multiple times in a ferocious assault" by a group of men wearing masks.

FEROCIOUS ASSAULT

Detective Inspector Tony Kirk, of the Mets Specialist Crime Command, said. “David’s family are going through unimaginable torment.

“Within days his mother has seen the death of her husband and son; his sister has lost her brother and father, both are now heartbroken.

“David was a young man who had worked hard to put himself through university and, like his mother, worked hard for the community in the NHS.

Within days his mother has seen the death of her husband and son.

“At this time we believe the only thing David did to be murdered was walk down a street.

“He was apparently approached by a group of men wearing masks and stabbed multiple times in a ferocious assault.

“I have no doubt this was a planned attack that singled out David because he happened to be in that area.

FAMILY TRAGEDY

“David and his mother, who have done so much to help the community, now need the public to come forward and tell us what they know.

“If you have any information, please think of this young man and the suffering of his family and call us.

“If you don’t want to give your name, call Crimestoppers, but do make that call. David’s family deserve both answers and justice.”

Cops believe those involved left the scene in a stolen Silver Dodge Caliber that was abandon at 10.30pm near Canning Town.

The vehicle car had been stolen in Dagenham on Thursday, April 16 and was on cloned plates when it was recovered.

There have been no arrests at this time.

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A Scotland Yard spokesman said: "Nothing in David’s background gives any reason for why he was singled out and this, along with other evidence, suggests David was murdered in a totally unprovoked attack.

"Police want to speak to anyone who was in the area or anyone who remembers seeing this car, whether before or after the attack.

"In particular anyone who has dash cam footage, or CCTV of the area around where the car was dumped, should contact detectives.

"Any witnesses or anyone with any information is asked to call detectives at the incident room on 0208 345 3985."



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NHS workers need to be re-tested for coronavirus after minister admits early tests were inaccurate

NHS workers need to be re-tested for coronavirus after a minister admitted the early tests were inaccurate.

Care Minister Helen Whately today refused to rule out NHS staff having been cleared by the inaccurate tests and going back to work.

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Appearing on Sky News, Ms Whately announced Brits who had the inaccurate tests were now being notified.

She said: "My understanding from the clinical advisers is that some of the early tests were evaluated and the evaluation is that they weren't effective enough.

"This is a normal process when you are using a test for an illness when this is a new illness.

"Those that were tested with the test that wasn't up to scratch have been written to and offered another test."

Asked if this meant NHS workers and Care Home Staff could have gone back to work with the coronavirus, Ms Whateley did not answer the question.

She said: "We have to make sure we look at the reliability of tests.

"This is really really important, not just to test but to make sure we test people effectively."

It comes as Public Health England (PHE) have now sent a memo warning the tests are not as accurate as first thought – raising the possibility of those thinking they were coronavirus-free were actually still contagious.

Almost 100,000 NHS and social care workers along with their relatives have undergone coronavirus tests to get staff back on the frontline.

The memo – dated April 11 – reveals there had been "discordant results" in the tests leading to them having to be re-checked in a lab.

PHE has told all of its 12 centres to scrap the existing tests by Thursday due to "quality assurance difficulties", instead switching to commercial tests.

It means some staff may still have had the virus, or others who were told they had antibodies may have never actually had Covid-19 at all.

A Government official branded the tests – which had been developed by PHE –  as "home brew".

The test was originally developed in January, but it is feared its accuracy depended on factors such as the skill with which it was used.

Analysis of 1,144 samples of the tests in one lab found about three per cent of results showed discrepancies.

The memo said shortages of swabs and transport led to local variations in the way the tests were run – potentially skewing the accuracy.

Enzymes in the test had also degraded, possibly lead to errors in the results.

PHE officials said staff had been given advice on how to "mitigate" problems with the system.



A Whitehall official said: "PHE want to be in control of everything, and that's a problem.

"They've taken too long to involve the academic and private sector, and so we've relied on the home brew test for too long."

It came as health secretary Matt Hancock boasted it was "terrific" that the UK now had the capacity to carry out 39,000 tests a day.

Doris-Ann Williams, the chief executive of the British In Vitro Diagnostic Association, said: "I think in this case it would be fair to say that, if private companies had been embraced a little earlier, perhaps we wouldn't have been so reliant on the initial PHE test.

"But I would also say that the commercial tests also took some time to develop accuracy."

PHE officials insisted that the differences did not mean the tests were worse than commercial tests, and that the margin of error had been brought down to less than two per cent.

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Professor Sharon Peacock, director of the national infection service at PHE, said: "No diagnostic test is 100 per cent sensitive.

"Following a rigorous evaluation, we learned the PCR test produced different results to alternative tests in less than two per cent of samples, and we issued immediate actions to laboratory staff to ensure the continued reliability of the test.

"The test is regularly and thoroughly reviewed to make sure it remains reliable and effective.

"It is standard practice to move to commercial test kits once available, and this work is already under way."

Britain remains under lockdown as the coronavirus figures continue to climb, with the death toll rising by 828 today bringing the total to more than 17,000.

It is hoped soon measures may be eased to get the UK moving again, but the cabinet is divided amid fears of a second wave.

Meanwhile, it emerged NHS Nightingale has reportedly turned away more patients than it has treated.

And Britain is expected to begin human testing of an experimental vaccine in bid to beat the coronavirus.


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NHS nurse heartbroken after daughter, 8, begs her not to work during coronavirus pandemic as ‘I don’t want you to die’ – The Sun


A FRONTLINE nurse was left “broken” as her sobbing daughter told her: “I need you – I don’t want you to die.”

Kate Tilford, 44, revealed how her terrified daughter, eight, begged her not to go to work over protective kit shortages.

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Ms Tilford, who works in A&E in Essex, blasted the government over the critical lack of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and said she was forced to lie about her safety.

She said: “I put her to bed and she was crying her eyes out, saying ‘mummy I need you – I don’t want you to die’.

“I’m having to lie to her, telling her not to worry and that I’m protected.

“But I know it’s not true. I’m not well protected and I am at risk.

“I’m so angry that the government has placed me in the position where I’m lying to my own daughter.”

More than 40 frontline healthcare workers have died from Covid-19 amid fears a lack of PPE is leaving them exposed.

I’m having to lie to her, telling her not to worry and that I’m protected.
But I know it’s not true. I’m not well protected and I am at risk.

Under revised Public Health England guidance, frontline staff have been told to wear plastic aprons if full-length waterproof gowns run out.

Ms Tilford, who has worked in the NHS for 25 years, said she has to use a "plastic pinny" and a "basic surgical mask" when treating casualty patients.

She said: “I go to work because I want to help people. I just want to do the best I can while I’m protected at the best level. How is that too much to ask?

"This is not about politics, this is about lives. The death toll of doctors and nurses is rising every day.

"There are massive numbers of NHS staff who are being put at risk because they don’t have access to protective equipment.

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"The government has mismanaged this from beginning to end and put health workers at risk."

The Department of Health said it was working “round the clock” to address PPE shortages in hospitals and social care settings.

A spokesman said: “New clinical advice has been issued to make sure that if there are shortages in one area, frontline staff know what PPE to wear instead to minimise risk.

“This has been reviewed by the Health and Safety Executive, and is in line with WHO and CDC guidance on PPE use in exceptional circumstances.

“There is a 24 hour NHS-run helpline where NHS and social care workers can call to report shortages in supply and it is crucial the relevant guidance for protective equipment is followed closely.”

The news comes as a radiographer and nursing assistant have become the latest NHS staff to die from the coronavirus.

Simon Guest, described as a “true gentleman” and Ruben Munoz, who a colleague called a star, are among the 80 health workers to have died of Covid-19.




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BRITAIN’s four million NHS staff are on the frontline in the battle against coronavirus.

But while they are helping save lives, who is there to help them?

The Sun has launched an appeal to raise £1MILLION for NHS workers.

The Who Cares Wins Appeal aims to get vital support to staff in their hour of need.

We have teamed up with NHS Charities Together in their urgent Covid-19 Appeal to ensure the money gets to exactly who needs it.

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Hero NHS worker, 61, died after telling kids 'please don't leave me – I don't want to die'

AN NHS admin worker died from Covid-19 just days after telling her kids: "Please don't leave me here – I don't want to die."

Mum-of-three Liz Shale, 61, was taken to St James's Hospital in Leeds, West Yorks, on March 31 but her condition continued to deteriorate.

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Days later medics told her devastated family there was nothing more they could do for her.

She passed away on April 9, seven minutes after her ventilator was removed.

Liz, who worked for the NHS for 20 years but spent the last decade working in palliative care in Bradford, had been urging people to take the virus seriously.

In her last Facebook post on March 23 she warned: "Just want to make this point in case people haven't realised it yet – the longer you don't comply with social distancing, the longer we're going to have to do it."

Last night, her family paid tribute to the "bubbly" gran-of-eight, of Leeds, West Yorks., and described her as the "glue that kept us all together".

Her eldest son, Jason Shale, 34, told The Sun: "When all this started she wanted to continue going into work.

"She was one of those bubbly people who liked to motivate everyone. She just continued trying to do that until she became ill.

"She was initially told she had flu but she was eventually taken into hospital.

"We spoke to her on the phone and she told my brother she thought she was going to die and not to leave her there.

"She didn't want to die and said she was scared.

"The consultants and doctors went above and beyond for her but she wasn't showing any improvements.

"All signs were actually showing that she was getting worse, that's why they decided to remove the ventilator."

Dad-of-three Jason, a mental health nurse, said they had since been told they will not be allowed into the crematorium for her funeral.

He added: "We can attend but only in the car park and remaining in our cars.

"We have first hand experience of when people don't adhere to the rules, this is where you end up.

"The rules aren't there to be punitive, they are there to make sure that everyone stands a fair chance.

"At this moment in time my mum's body is classed as a biohazard. No one can open her coffin or do anything with it because of the risks.

"The last thing she would want is anyone getting it from her."

Liz's devastated butcher son, Matthew Jones, 24, said: "She was truly amazing.

"We shared plenty of good memories that will stay in my heart forever and never be forgotten.

"She loved all her family and friends, it won’t be the same without her. #stayhome stay safe."

It comes as the UK's death toll yesterday rose by 847, taking the total to 14,576.

At least 50 NHS staff, care home workers, hospital employees, and other health workers, have died so far in the coronavirus crisis.

Join our George Cross campaign for NHS staff

SUN readers are today urged to sign a petition calling for our NHS staff to be awarded the George Cross.

Yesterday, we backed a proposal by Lord Ashcroft to honour our health heroes with the gallantry gong given for acts of bravery that did not take place in battle.

A No10 spokesman said: “The NHS is doing a fantastic job and the nation will want to find a way to say thank you when we have defeated this virus.”

SAS hero Andy McNab added: “The award of a George Cross would show an emotional appreciation.”

We are asking readers to sign the petition online at thesun.co.uk/georgecrossfornhs.

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'high risk' NHS worker parents reunite with their daughter

Emotional moment NHS worker couple wearing full PPE reunite with their daughter, 6, after making the ‘hardest decision ever’ to separate from her for three weeks due to Covid-19

  • Amanda and Ryan Holland were filmed surprising their daughter Kalishah
  • Scotland based couple were separated from their six-year-old for three weeks
  • They decided to isolate away from Kalishah because of their ‘high risk’ NHS jobs
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

Two ‘hero’ NHS workers have shared the heartwarming moment they were reunited with their six-year-old daughter after spending three weeks apart due to the coronavirus.

Amanda and Ryan Holland, from Ayr, Scotland, were filmed surprising Kalishah, while wearing head-to-toe PPE due to their exposure to Covid-19.

The couple, who work alongside each other in Ayr Hospital, said it was the ‘hardest decision of their lives’ to separate their family and send their daughter to stay with her grandparents.

Amanda, 32, who is a domestic supervisor and nursing assistant, and Ryan, 35, who is a hospital porter, said they were desperate to see Kalishah. 

Kalishah, six, was surprised by her parents in head-to-toe PPE, after being separated for three weeks. Pictured: Amanda, 32, and Ryan Holland, 35, with Kalishah

Sharing her decision on Facebook, Amanda wrote: ‘We decided it would be in the best interest of our daughter and my mum and dad that the 3 of them would isolate together away from me and Ryan. We both work in an acute hospital setting, posing a very high risk to Kalishah catching this virus.

‘Ryan and I are absolutely devastated and feel lost without our wee side chick, but from advice we were given it was for the best to keep them safe. Now people might realise why we get so p****d off when we see people not following the rules.

‘Can’t sacrifice being outside when we sacrificed our daughter because of this virus. Everyone please just stay at home and follow the guidelines so I can get my baby home.’

The video sees Amanda and Ryan surprise their daughter and embrace her in an emotional hug.

It has received nearly 8,000 views and hundreds of comments in just 24 hours.

Mrs Holland said she came up with the idea to surprise their daughter while wearing full PPE after seeing a video from America of a young girl being reunited with her police officer father during lockdown.

She said: ‘It made me get my thinking cap on as to how I could do the same. We’ve been desperate for three weeks now, and it’s hard because she is always with us.

Amanda, 32, who is a domestic supervisor and nursing assistant, and Ryan, 35, who is a hospital porter, made a decision to isolate away from their daughter because of their ‘high risk’ jobs. Pictured: Amanda and Ryan with Kalishah

Footage of Kalishah reuniting with her parents racked up almost 8,000 views within 24 hours of being posted. Pictured: Kalishah with her grandparents 

‘I’m so happy that I got a cuddle from Kalishah. We all needed it because we miss each other very much. My mum and dad are both in the high-risk category so we can’t see them or our daughter at the moment.’

After an emotional video call three weeks earlier, Amanda’s parents agreed the best decision would be for them to take Kalishah, so the three of them could safely comply with lockdown guidelines.

Mrs Holland added: ‘Staying away from my parents and Kalishah is to keep them all safe as the risk from my husband and I is just too much.’

The couple said Kalishah was ‘completely fine’ with seeing her parents in full PPE – as the family wore head-to-toe body suits, masks, gloves and goggles to keep safe.

 Kalishah, pictured on Facetime with Amanda, has been isolating with her grandparents while her parents work for the NHS

Amanda came up with a plan with her parents and they tricked Kalishah by telling her she was going to help do some painting in the garden.

Mrs Holland said: ‘My mum and dad had told her she was going out the back to help her Papa paint the wall. Little did she know me and her dad would be outside dressed the same as her for a cuddle.

‘She was completely gobsmacked when I shouted to her for a cuddle because we usually only see each other through the window and on FaceTime.’

Despite staying strong and positive through this tough time, Amanda admitted her family’s sacrifices are harder to face when people ignore the rules.

Amanda recently took to Facebook blasting those who are not following Covid-19 guidelines seriously. Pictured: Kalishah on Facetime with Amanda

Amanda praised groups in her local community that have organised food for the vulnerable. Pictured: Amanda, Ryan and Kalishah

In a recent Facebook post, she slammed those not taking Covid-19 seriously and said she ‘feels like the worst person in the world’ after having to separate from her daughter.

The mother also described the heart wrenching impact Covid-19 has had on their usual family routine.

She said: ‘At night, we video call and we cuddle in bed and watch a movie together till Kalishah falls asleep.’

Kalishah said she’ll never be able to repay her parents for taking Kalishah, to keep her safe. Pictured: Kalishah with her grandparents

Despite being exhausted, Amy and Ryan said the morale and staff are brilliant in the hospital they work in.

They praised their team, saying: ‘We are all in this together and we will fight with every ounce of fight we have in us. We are a part of such a brilliant team.’

However they said the hardest thing they have had to witness is other people not taking coronavirus seriously.

Amanda said: ‘Having parties and going to the shop for minor things like a can of juice or a bar of chocolate. It’s hard when I know how serious this is and not being able to see my parents or Kalishah in all of this.’

But the couple also praised their local community and said it is great how schools and local groups have been giving out food boxes and preparing food for the vulnerable.

Mrs Holland said: ‘It’s great to see how in a crisis, the community spirit always shines through.

‘Most of all, myself and my husband just want to thank my mum and dad for taking Kalishah away from the risk and keeping her safe. I’ll never be able to repay them.’

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