BBC Breakfast: Owain Wyn Evans felt ‘rude not to’ perform before Carol Kirkwood ‘heir’ gag

Owain Wyn Evans gives drumming performance on BBC News

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The Welsh broadcaster has amassed a large following since being announced as a part-time weather presenter on BBC Breakfast in February. Owain is regularly bombarded with praise from fans on Twitter, including one who tipped him as Carol Kirkwood’s “heir apparent”. The 37-year-old gave a special performance last week when he reenacted a presentation that made him go viral.

Owain shot to fame last year when he played an impressive drum solo to the BBC News opening music. 

The video brought a smile to many during the coronavirus pandemic and earned him more fans. 

The star has continued to impress viewers since he started presenting weather forecasts for the BBC nine years ago.

Owain’s career started out in Wales on the children’s news show Ffeil at 18 years old, which led him to land more TV shows. 

His stint on-air led him to change career paths.

Prior to then, Owain wanted to be a professional percussion drummer and applied for the job on Ffeil while he honed his skills.

He told the Manchester Evening News that he was surprised to land the job after he accidentally “swore” and knocked over a jug of water.

Soon after, he became enchanted with presenting and decided to study meteorology with the Open University.

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Owain then got a job at BBC Wales and started delivering weather reports in 2012.

He was announced as the leader weather presenter on North West Tonight seven years later.

Since then the TV star’s career has skyrocketed and he’s appeared on Michael McIntyre’s The Wheel and The Big New Year’s In.

Owain’s popularity peaked last year after he performed the BBC jingle, which revealed his drumming talent to viewers.

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On Twitter, the clip was watched more than 2.5 million times, retweeted 24,600 times and liked 104,600 times.

Last week, a repeat opportunity arose for Owain to display his skills once more. 

After informing BBC North West Tonight viewers about the weather, the famous BBC News music started to play.

Owain said: “Oh my, this is like Deja Vu isn’t it… maybe I’ll do it again!”

The TV star jokingly pretended to be unaware of the stunt as he walked across the studio to his drum kit.

He said: “Oh my, what is this? It’s my drum kit, well it would be rude not to have a go.”

Owain chanted “here we go” twice before launching into an impressive solo – around one year on from a video of the first one going viral.  

The forecaster beamed a broad smile during the performance and once he finished, received applause from his co-stars.

Owain Wyn Evans plays BBC theme tune on the drums

In the final moments of the clip, Owain laughed as he clapped his drumsticks together.

Later, he posted the clip on Twitter, which he captioned: “Drumming weatherman… the sequel. LIVE. This was so much fun!”

Owain’s tweet appeared to be well-received online as 32,000 people liked it and 5,200 retweeted the post.

Soon after, he thanked the BBC’s technical team for allowing his “percussive princess” in the studio.

In response, one fan described the moment as “brilliant” and claimed it “made my day”.

A second said it was “absolutely magical” before thanking him for making her “smile”.

A third told Owain their seven-year-old had started playing the drums last year and found his performance “sooo coool (sic)”. 

BBC Breakfast airs from 6am on BBC One.

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