China claims Wuhan has only TWO critical COVID-19 patients left

China claims Wuhan has only TWO critically ill coronavirus patients left as it promises to give $30 million extra to the WHO after the US halted its funds

  • There are 69 active COVID-19 cases in former epicentre Wuhan, an official said
  • Only two of them are in critical condition and 28 recovered yesterday, he added
  • Another big Chinese city has adopted draconian measures to curb an outbreak
  • Beijing today announced new donation to the WHO to help developing countries
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

China has announced that there are only two critically ill coronavirus patients left in Wuhan, the former epicentre of the pandemic.

The news comes as another major Chinese city with around 10 million people has adopted draconian quarantine measures to curb a new COVID-19 outbreak.

Beijing has also promised to send $30million extra to the World Health Organization (WHO) after Washington said it would freeze its $500million funding to the agency.

There are currently 69 active COVID-19 cases including two critical cases in Wuhan, according to officials. Pictured, a medic attends to an ICU patient at Tongji Hospital in Wuhan on April 11

Over 82,000 people in mainland China have been infected with the deadly disease and at least 4,632 patients have died, according to China’s official figures. Pictured, a recovered patient wearing a face shield lines up in a hospital after the lockdown was lifted in Wuhan on April 13

Mi Feng, a spokesperson from the Chinese Centre of Disease Prevention and Control, said in a press conference today that Wuhan now only has two coronavirus patients who are in critical condition.

‘But some areas with infection clusters have seen an increase in confirmed cases,’ Mi continued.

‘[We need to] cut the source of the spread quickly, fill in the loopholes in epidemic control and firmly prevent the second wave of outbreak.’

Mi Feng, a spokesperson from the Chinese Centre of Disease Prevention and Control, said today that the number of active confirmed patients in China has dropped below 1,000 for the first time. The health official is pictured speaking at a press briefing earlier this month

Mi’s remarks comes as Harbin, the provincial capital of Heilongjiang in north-eastern China, is grappling with what is now the country’s biggest coronavirus outbreak. 

The city of around 10 million has a similar population and the same political importance as Wuhan.  

The government yesterday released a directive to instruct further restrictions on its residents, visitors and inbound traffic.  

Harbin, the provincial capital and the biggest city of Heilongjiang, which borders Russia

Officials say the virus was likely ‘imported’ into the city by a student who had returned from New York. Pictured, passengers wearing masks push luggage carts at Harbin airport on April 11

Mi said today that the number of active confirmed patients in China has dropped below 1,000 for the first time.

More than half of the patients who contracted the bug from abroad have recovered, the official stated.

Over 82,000 people in mainland China have been infected with the deadly disease and at least 4,632 patients have died, according to China’s official figures.

China has recorded 1,616 ‘imported cases’ from abroad, including 793 active cases and 823 patients who have recovered.

A total of 77,207 coronavirus patients have been discharged from hospitals in the country.

The former ground zero Hubei Province has borne the brunt of the coronavirus cases in China, with a total of 68,128 infections and 4,512 deaths.

There are 69 active confirmed cases in Hubei as of today and 63,547 patients have recovered from the deadly disease.

China puts a city of 10 million ‘on lockdown’ to curb a new outbreak 

A major Chinese city has adopted draconian quarantine measures against the novel coronavirus after a new outbreak was detected there.

More than 70 people have been infected and over 4,000 are being tested in Harbin after the virus was believed to be ‘imported’ into the city by a student who had returned from New York, according to media reports.

Officials have banned gatherings and ordered communities to closely monitor non-local visitors and vehicles in the city of around 10 million.

Checkpoints have been installed at the airport and train stations, to screen those coming from elsewhere.

Harbin’s government said this month it was ordering 28 days of quarantine for all arrivals from abroad, with two nucleic acid tests and an antibody test for each. Pictured, workers in protective suits are seen at a registration point for passengers at an airport in Harbin on April 11

Harbin, the provincial capital of Heilongjiang in north-eastern China, has been grappling with what is now the country’s biggest coronavirus outbreak.

The government yesterday released a directive to instruct further restrictions on its residents, visitors and inbound traffic.

Before entering any public facilities and residential complexes, people must use a government-approved health app to prove they don’t have the virus, have their temperature taken and wear a face mask, the notice says.

Residents must follow social-distancing measures. Weddings, funerals, public performances and conferences are banned.

A man is pictured keeping watch at a checkpoint in Suifenhe, Heilongjiang, on April 21

All confirmed, suspected, asymptomatic cases and their close contacts will be put into strict quarantine. All their neighbours in the same building must be isolated at home for two weeks with around-the-clock surveillance.

Asymptomatic cases are those who carry the virus but show no symptoms. They can still spread the virus to others.

Anyone in home-quarantine must pass two nucleic acid tests, which detect the coronavirus, and one anti-body test, which shows if the person has had the virus in the past.

Harbin, Heilongjiang’s biggest city, had already ordered isolation for those arriving from outside China or key epidemic areas.

The city’s government said this month it was ordering 28 days of quarantine for all arrivals from abroad, with two nucleic acid tests and an antibody test for each.

Beijing today announced an extra $30 million in its funds to the WHO.

Foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said the new donation would be in addition to a previous $20 million committed and would help ‘strengthen developing countries’ health systems’.

The US, which is the WHO’s biggest contributor, accused the organisation last week of ‘mismanaging’ the COVID-19 crisis, drawing ire from Beijing as both countries spar over the deadly virus.

Foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang (pictured on March 18) said Beijing’s new donation to the World Health Organization would help ‘strengthen developing countries’ health systems’

The WHO, under the leadership of Ethiopian Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (pictured on March 11), has been accused by Washington of being ‘China-centric’ in its handling of the pandemic

Geng added that China’s contribution to the UN agency ‘reflects the support and trust of the Chinese government and people for the WHO’.

In announcing the funding freeze last week, US President Donald Trump accused the WHO of covering up the seriousness of the coronavirus outbreak in China before it spread.

He has also charged the WHO with being ‘very China-centric’ despite Washington’s heavy funding.

According to Trump, US taxpayers provided between $400 million and $500 million per year to the WHO, while ‘in contrast, China contributes roughly $40 million a year and even less’.

Sources said American analysts will present their findings ‘in the near term’ to Trump, who will then huddle with aides to determine how to hold China accountable for the pandemic 

The pandemic has claimed more than 48,000 lives and infected over 856,000 in the US

Trump also claimed the outbreak could have been contained with ‘very little death’ had the WHO assessed the situation in China accurately.

The deadly virus, which has claimed more than 181,000 lives worldwide, first emerged in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, which was locked down in late January for 76 days to curb the spread.

It continued its global march, however, with cases reported in 193 countries and territories to date, ravaging economies around the globe.

Beijing has urged the US to support WHO-led international action against the pandemic after it halted funding, while observers warned that the US freeze would have consequences for the WHO’s other disease control programmes around the world.

Beijing defends the WHO after Trump accused the agency of being ‘China-centric’ 

China has denied Western suggestions that it covered up the extent of the virus outbreak, rejecting claims it has an overly cosy relationship with the WHO as well.

But local authorities did silence doctors who tried to raise the alarm about the virus in Wuhan in December.

An investigation determined that police ‘inappropriately’ punished one of the whistle-blowers, Li Wenliang, an eye disease specialist who later died of the COVID-19 disease.

The US is the country worst-hit by the coronavirus, with a death toll of around 48,000. Pictured, a worker wearing a face mask and protective clothing prepares the body of a COVID-19 victim at a morgue in Montgomery county, Maryland on April 17

The WHO, under the leadership of Ethiopian Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, has been accused by Washington of uncritically accepting China’s early assertions that the virus was not spread between humans, and of wrongly praising Beijing’s ‘transparency’ over the magnitude of the crisis.

The pandemic, combined with the threat of a halt in US funding, marks the biggest challenge to date in Tedros’ near three-year tenure.

‘Supporting the WHO at this critical time in the global fight against the epidemic is defending the ideals and principles of multilateralism and upholding the status and authority of the United Nations,’ Foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said.

The US is the country worst-hit by the coronavirus, with a death toll of around 48,000.

Numbers in China have dwindled as it begins to cautiously lift virus control measures, although fears remain over a potential resurgence and imported infections from abroad. 

 

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