Covid deaths fall AGAIN: Just 84 virus victims registered last week

Weekly Covid deaths in England and Wales fall AGAIN: Just 84 virus victims registered last week in 14% drop – as data shows more than a THIRD of all councils across two nations haven’t suffered a fatality since April

  • Covid deaths registered in the week ending June 11 fell to its lowest level since before the second lockdown 
  • Office for National Statistics show 294 authorities (89%) recorded less than three Covid deaths since April
  • Some 122 out of 331 (37%) of English and Wales authorities recorded no Covid deaths over May and June 

Weekly coronavirus deaths have fallen again in England and Wales to just 84 — the lowest figure recorded since September last year. 

There were 83 death certificates mentioning Covid in England and just one in Wales in the week ending June 11, according to data published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). 

For comparison, the figure for the previous seven-day spell was 98.

Meanwhile, the same set of statistics also showed Covid accounted for just 0.8 per cent of all deaths recorded across the two countries in the most recent week.

And analysis of the data by MailOnline revealed more than a third of all 300-plus councils across the two nations have not suffered a Covid fatality since April.

But Covid deaths lag behind infections by several weeks because of how long it takes for infected patients to fall seriously ill, meaning the rapid spread of the Indian variant — which forced Boris Johnson into delaying Freedom Day by four weeks — has yet to be picked up in fatality figures.  

Scientists are divided on how much the increase in cases will affect death figures, with 31.5million Britons being fully vaccinated.

But the increase in coronavirus hospitalisations seen over the past fortnight suggests that some increase in daily deaths is inevitable in the coming weeks.

The ONS data showed deaths in general increased 31 per cent across both countries from 7,778 to 10,204 — but the figures are skewed by the May 31 bank holiday, with the delay in registrations over the long weekend pushing thousands of fatalities onto the following week. 

Weekly Covid deaths have fallen again in England and Wales by 14 per cent to just 84 — the lowest figure recorded since September last year — Office for National Statistics data showed today

Despite high vaccination rates among the elderly, most Covid deaths (45 out of 84) were in people aged 75 or over during the week

The ONS data showed deaths in general increased 31 per cent across both countries from 7,778 to 10,204 but the figures are skewed by the May 31 Spring Bank Holiday, which would have increased the number of deaths recorded in the week ending June 4

More than a third of all councils across the two nations have not suffered a fatality since April

Just 14 care home resident deaths involving Covid in England and Wales were registered in the week, up from 13 in the previous week

Some 122 out of 331 (37 per cent) of local authorities in England and Wales recorded no Covid deaths since April, the data showed.

Only two authorities recorded double figures: Bradford (18) and Bolton (11), which is the area that has been worst affected by the Indian variant and was inundated with cases of the mutant strain.

Some 294 authorities (89 per cent) recorded less than three fatalities with Covid on the death certificate over May and June.

But of the ten areas with the highest case numbers since April, five were some of the original Indian variant hotspots that were hit worst by the variant before it became dominant across the UK. Other than Bolton, they were: Leeds (nine), Birmingham (eight), Blackburn (seven) and Bury (six).

Despite high vaccination rates among the elderly, most Covid deaths (45 out of 84) were in people aged 75 or over during the week. One death was recorded in the 10 to 14 age range, for the first time since March 19.

Just 14 care home resident deaths involving Covid in England and Wales were registered in the week, up from 13 in the previous week.

Some 42,525 care home residents in England and Wales have now had Covid recorded on their death certificate.

Meanwhile, a total of 153,630 deaths have now occurred in the UK where Covid was mentioned on the death certificate, the ONS said.

The highest number of deaths to occur on a single day was 1,481 on January 19. During the first wave of the virus, the daily death toll peaked at 1,461 deaths on April 8, 2020.

Boris Johnson yesterday poured cold water on the prospect of easing the remaining coronavirus rules early, as he refused to rule out future lockdowns and warned the nation should brace for a ‘rough winter’. 

No10 has delayed ‘freedom day’ by four weeks to July 19 but a two-week review will take place on July 5 to see if the return to normal can be moved forward. 

Mr Johnson struck a pessimistic tone during a visit to a laboratory in Hertfordshire as he said ‘Delta’ variant cases, hospitalisations and admissions to intensive care are still rising and the country must therefore be ‘cautious’. 

But he insisted it is ‘looking good’ for the rules to be lifted at the ‘terminus point’ of July 19 as he said the ‘vaccination rollout is going gangbusters’.

However, he declined to rule out re-imposing draconian curbs later in the year as he warned ‘some new horror’ could emerge which ‘we simply haven’t budgeted for’.

Meanwhile, the PM also dashed hopes of international travel being opened up in time for summer holidays as he admitted foreign trips this year will be ‘difficult’ — despite ministers drawing up plans to scrap quarantine rules for returning double-jabbed Britons.

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